OTHER INSECTS PEST CONTROL

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house cricket pest control
Earwig pest control
Centipede pest control
Milipede pest control

The name House Cricket comes from the fact that these crickets often enter houses where they can survive indefinitely. House crickets are reared in commercial cricket factories and sold in bait and pet stores.

COLOR: Yellowish brown with 3 dark cross-bands on head

LEGS: 6

SHAPE: Long with short, stout hind legs; threadlike antennae, longer than body

SIZE: 3/4- 7/8 ”

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S., but primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, also spread by human activities

Habits:
House crickets are nocturnal and usually hide in dark, warm places during the day. Male house crickets chirp and attract females by rubbing a scraper on the inner edge of the left wing against the teeth of a file beneath the right wing. Outside, crickets are attracted to bluish electric lights and can often be seen swarming near them in large numbers. They feed on plants and dead or live insects, including other crickets.

Habitat:
During warm weather, house crickets typically live outdoors and can commonly be found in garbage dumps. With the approach of cold weather they seek shelter indoors, especially in places such as sheds and houses, seeking areas of moisture and fermentation.

Threats:
When crickets find their way inside homes, they can damage clothing, carpeting and other fabrics including wool, cotton, silk, and synthetics. They can eat through large areas of fabric, and are especially attracted to clothes soiled with perspiration.

Earwigs got their name from the myth that they crawl into sleeping people’s ears and tunnel into their brains. The long cerci, or clippers, on their backsides easily identify an earwig.

COLOR: Dark brown

LEGS: 6

SHAPE: Long, narrow

SIZE: 1″

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:
Earwigs hide during the day and feeds on leaves, flowers, fruits, mold and insects at night.

Habitat:
These insects live together outdoors in large numbers. They can be found under piles of lawn debris, mulch or in tree holes. They gain entry to a structure through exterior cracks

Threats:
Contrary to folklore, earwigs do not crawl into ears and eat peoples’ brains at night. They do not spread diseases, but their menacing appearance can be alarming to a homeowner.

Centipedes are sometimes called “hundred-leggers” because of their many pairs of legs, but they can actually have anywhere from 15-177 pairs of legs, depending on the species. Interestingly, centipedes always have an odd number of pairs of legs.

COLOR: Yellowish to dark brown, sometimes with darker stripes or markings

LEGS:

SHAPE: Elongated, flattened, worm-like
SIZE: 1/8 – 6”

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:

Most centipedes are nocturnal, and prey primarily on flies, spiders, and sometimes plant tissue.

Habitat:
Centipedes are found throughout the United States and the world. They are typically found in areas of high moisture, such as in rotting logs, under stones, in trash or piles of leaves/grass. When they invade homes, centipedes are most commonly found in damp basements, crawlspaces, bathrooms, or potted plants.

Threats:
Centipedes are generally considered nuisance pests, as they do not pose significant health or property threats. However, all centipedes have poison jaws with which they inject venom into their prey. If handled roughly, some larger species can inflict a painful bite that can break human skin and causes pain and swelling, similar to a bee sting.

Millipedes are sometimes called “thousand-leggers” because of their many pairs of legs, but they can actually have anywhere from 30-90+ pairs of legs, depending on the species. The leggiest is Illacme plenipes, which can have more than 333 pairs of legs.

COLOR: Blackish or brownish, some red, orange or with mottled patterns.

LEGS:

SHAPE: Long, cylindrical and wormlike

SIZE: 1/16 – 4½ ” (2-155 mm)

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:
Most millipedes are nocturnal and are primarily scavengers, feeding on decaying plants and occasionally dead insects. In the autumn, millipedes are known to migrate in great numbers.

Habitat:
Millipedes are found throughout the world, with about 1,000 species occurring in the United States alone. They are typically found in areas of high moisture and decaying vegetation, such as under trash, in piles of grass clippings, flower-bed mulches, piles of leaves, etc. Millipedes do not usually survive indoors for more than a few days unless there are high moisture conditions and a food supply is present.

Threats:
Some millipede species give off an ill-smelling fluid through openings along the sides of the body. In some instances, this fluid can be toxic to small animals and pets, and can cause small blisters on humans.

Sow bug pest control
Silverfish pest control
Fleas pest control
The Western black-legged tick pest control

The Pillbug is the only crustacean that has become completely adapted to spending its life on land. Pillbugs have oval bodies and seven pairs of legs. They are easily recognized by their back, which is made up of seven hard individual plates. Pillbugs are sometimes referred to as rollie-pollies.

COLOR: Dark brown to black

LEGS: Seven pair

SHAPE: Oval; round when rolled up

SIZE: 3/4″

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:
Pillbugs eat decaying vegetable material and are most active at night. They are known for their ability to roll into a ball.

Habitat:
Pillbugs live in moist locations. They are found under damp objects or under vegetable debris.

Threats:
Pillbugs do not spread diseases or invade food products. However, the pillbug is often considered a pest when it gains entry into a home.

The Silverfish gets its name from its silvery, metallic appearance and fish-like shape and movements. Silverfish have no wings, but are able to run very fast. They tend to hide their presence from humans which means any damage they have caused could go unnoticed as well.

COLOR: Silver to brown

LEGS: 6

SHAPE: Oval, elongated

SIZE: ¾ inches

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:
Silverfish tend to feed on paper items, glue, clothing and food items, such as flour and rolled oats. Silverfish can live up to a year without food, but require a high humidity environment. They move fast and are typically nocturnal.

Habitat:
Silverfish are found throughout the U.S. and are typically seen in moist, humid areas in the home, such as bathrooms, basements, and attics.

Threats:
While silverfish are mainly a nuisance pest, they can contaminate food and damage paper goods such as wall paper and books.

Fleas are parasites that feed on the blood of any warm-blooded body. The most common species is the cat flea, which often feasts on cats, dogs and humans.

COLOR: Dark reddish-brown

LEGS: 6

SHAPE: Flat

SIZE: 1/12 to 1/6-inch long

ANTENNAE: True

REGION: Found throughout U.S.

Habits:
Fleas transport themselves on rodents and other mammals. They infest both household pests and wild animals. Fleas use their powerful legs to jump as high as 8 inches vertically and 16 inches horizontally.

Habitat:
Fleas usually remain on their warm-blooded hosts at all times. They can also be found on shoes, pant legs, or blankets, which can transfer the fleas to new environments. They are often found infesting opossums, raccoons, and skunks in urban settings.

Threats:
Fleas are the most common transmitter of the rare Bubonic Plague. They also transmit the bacterial disease murine typhus to humans through infected rats. Their saliva can cause serious Flea Alergy Dermatitus in pets, and their debris has been reported to cause similar allergic reactions in humans. Fleas can also transfer tapeworms and cause anemia in pets. Flea bites commonly cause painful, itchy red bumps.

A notorious biting arachnid, the Blacklegged tick is named for its dark legs, which are in contrast to its pale body. Blacklegged ticks are sometimes called Deer Ticks.

Color:

Orange-brown with dark legs
Legs:

8
Shape:

Flat; broad oval
Size:

1/8 ”
Antennae:

No
Region:

Found primarily in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, southeastern and north central regions of the U.S.

Habits:

During the winter, adult ticks feed primarily on the blood of white-tailed deer, which is why they are sometimes called deer ticks. In the spring, a female tick will drop off its host and will deposit about 3,000 eggs. Nymphs, or baby ticks, feed on mice, squirrels, raccoons, skunks, dogs, humans and birds.

Habitat:

Blacklegged ticks prefer to hide in grass and shrubs while waiting for a passing host.

Threats:

Blacklegged ticks or deer ticks are a vector of anaplasmosis, babeosis and Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a primary concern in the United States. Symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, fatigue and a characteristic bull’s eye-shaped skin rash. Lyme disease can also affect joints, the heart and the nervous system if left untreated.

american dog tick pest control
Dog tick pest control
Tick pest control
Lone star pest control

The American dog tick gets its name from the fact that adult ticks prefer domestic dogs as hosts, and this tick species is only found in North America.
If a tick is found on the body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick as this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, thoroughly clean the bite site with soap and water. Then, flush the tick down the toilet or wrap it in a tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.

Color:

Brown with whitish to gray markings
Legs:

Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
Shape:

Oval, flattened
Size:

3/16” unengorged,  5/8” engorged
Antennae:

No
Region:

Found throughout the U.S., except the Rocky Mountains area

Habits:

It is thought that American dog ticks are attracted by the scent of animals, so they are common along roads and trails. Adult ticks prefer domestic dogs as hosts and can therefore be brought into the home and potentially transferred to humans.

Habitat:

These ticks prefer grassy areas with low vegetation where larger mammals pass by. American dog ticks do not survive well indoors.

Threats:

The American dog tick is the primary vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the United States. It is also known to transmit tularemia, a rare bacterial infection, and cause tick paralysis.

The Brown Dog tick is named for its color and because it is found on domestic dogs. Although it is unusual for a brown dog tick to bite humans, it will do so in the absence of a canine host.
If a tick is found on the body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick as this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, thoroughly clean the bite site with soap and water. Then, flush the tick down the toilet or wrap it in a tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.

Color:

Reddish brown, gray-blue when engorged
Legs:

Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
Shape:

Oval, flattened
Size:

1/8”  unengorged;  1/2”  engorged
Antennae:

No
Region:

Found throughout the U.S.

Habits:

Brown dog ticks prefer dogs as hosts. They typically attach to the ears or between the toes and do not travel very far after dropping off a host. They are unique because they can complete their entire life cycle indoors.

Habitat:

This tick survives best indoors and prefers warm, dry conditions.

Threats:

Brown dog ticks rarely attack humans, but they can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever and several other tick-borne diseases to dogs including canine ehrlichiosis and canine babesia.

The Gulf Coast Tick

Distribution:
The range of the Gulf Coast tick is historically described as a region approximately 100-150 miles inland along the Gulf of Mexico and southern Atlantic coast, extending from Texas to South Carolina. Resident populations of Gulf Coast ticks are established in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas, where their distributions appear to be expanding. Incidental introductions of these ticks beyond endemic regions occurs with increasing frequency; likely due to the feeding of immature ticks on migrating birds, and the transportation of tick infested livestock and wildlife into new areas.

Description:
A small to medium sized tick, body 3-7 mm long and 2-4 mm wide, with females reaching 18 x 13 mm dimensions at full engorgement. The dorsal area of unfed female ticks is reddish-brown; scutum is longer than wide and ornate, with reddish-brown markings over a pale cream background. Bodies of male Gulf Coast ticks are oval in shape, and pale in color with elongated reddish-brown mottling.

Hosts:
Larvae and nymphs feed on small mammals and ground-frequenting birds including quail, meadowlarks and field sparrows. However, there is increasing evidence indicating that nymphs may also attach to large animals (e.g. cattle), but because of their smaller size and shorter feeding period, may often go unnoticed. Adult ticks attach and feed on cattle, horses, deer, sheep, feral swine, coyotes, dogs, cats, and other carnivores.

Associated Disease Pathogens:
The Gulf Coast tick is an arthropod of increasing medical and veterinary importance. These ticks transmit the pathogen Rickettsia parkeri to humans, a type of spotted fever (rickettsiosis) to humans, Recent studies report infection rates of greater than 20% in Gulf Coast ticks. Gulf Coast ticks are also responsible for transmitting Hepatozoan americanum, a protozoal agent that causes American canine hepatozoonosis in wild and domestic canines in the US. This species has also been shown to experimentally transmit Ehrlichia ruminatium, causal agent of heartwater, a disease fatal to >80% of wild and domestic ruminants.

The Lone Star tick gets its name from the single silvery-white spot located on the female’s back. These ticks attack humans more frequently than any other tick species in the eastern and southeastern states.

Color:

Reddish brown, becoming slate gray when engorged
Legs:

Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
Shape:

Oval, flattened
Size:

Females are 1/6-1/4”  un-engorged and 1/2”  engorged; Males are smaller
Antennae:

No
Region:

West central Texas northward to northern Missouri and eastward from Maine to the southern tip of Florida

Habits:

The lone star tick is considered a three-host tick because each feeding stage requires a different host. Feeding typically occurs during the spring and early summer months. Larvae and nymphs feed on the blood of birds, rodents and small wild animals like rabbits, squirrels and raccoons. Adults often feed on larger animals, including foxes, dogs, white-tailed deer and humans. This tick species then enters a non-feeding period in mid to late summer, which is triggered by decreasing day length.

Habitat:

Lone star ticks cannot survive long exposures to sunlight, so they are typically found in shaded, wooded areas with low-growing vegetation.

Threats:

All three developmental stages of the lone star tick can feed on humans by attaching to the skin using its mouthparts. This tick can be a vector of tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and ehrlichiosis.